Jul 242014
 

mullumbimby community gardens

 

Mullum Community Garden is a community group for organic gardening, composting, water conservation and energy efficiency.

Address Southern end of Stuart Street, Mullumbimby, 2482
Coordinator: Jeannette Martin
Phone: 0412 32 2255
Postal: PO Box 149, Mullumbimby 2482
Email: info@sharacommunitygardens.org
Website http://mullumbimbycommunitygardens.org/

Mullumbimby Community Garden (MCG) is a not for profit, community based project of Mullum S.E.E.D. (Mullumbimby Sustainability Education and Enterprise Development incorporated)

Mullumbimby Community Garden lies on 5 hectares of lush Bundjalung country in Northern NSW. We acknowledge and respect the past and present custodians of this rich and fertile land.
 

Living Earth Festival

 

The Living Community Festival

When: 10am – 6pm Sunday 7th September 2014
Where: Mullumbimby Community Gardens

Mullum Community Garden Living Community Festival

Mullum Community Garden Living Community Festival

Enriching fun and learning for all, workshops will be presented in Permaculture, Biodynamics, Biochar and Sustainable Technologies; whilst the local food, arts and crafts market delivers the quintessential Northern Rivers experience.

FB Posts, Events, News...

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Yates Gardening's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

😍Laugh for the day ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

😍

 

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Nikita Vanderbyl

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Gardening Club of Australia's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

Happy Chinese New Year! ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

 

Comment on Facebook

or learn how to make wine!

Just not this summer.... 39 every day and no rain!

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Ross McGibbon Reptile Photography's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

Good information

Ross McGibbon Reptile Photography
EASTERN BROWN CHASING BEHAVIOUR EXPLAINED 👇🐍 When people tell of being ‘chased’ by a snake, they unknowingly misinterpret the snake’s behavior and intentions. When they encounter a snake and it becomes defensive toward them, most people interpret any advance towards them as though the snake has the intention to ‘catch’ and bite them. While a bite can be the result of a close encounter, it is usually the snake’s last resort. Biting is rarely their initial reaction unless you step on one causing it to bite in defense. In reality, the snake’s first intension is to act in a manner that intimidates the person into a hasty retreat. This is called defensive behavior and it may include the following actions - rearing up, hissing, gaping the mouth, flattening the neck to look bigger and mock or bluff striking. Occasionally, they may advance towards a perceived threat in order to force their opponent to retreat, allowing them opportunity to escape, or at least feel safe again (this is the behavior that is often mistaken for ‘chasing’). Snakes that encounter humans a lot, such as the eastern brown, have become quite good at intimidating humans into leaving them alone. It is important to understand that they are exhibiting this behavior because they perceive us as a large predator, and they don’t want to eaten. As clearly demonstrated in this video, the snake advances towards me in an assertive manner because it perceives me as a large predator. Once I retreat and give it some space, it dives for the nearest cover. What to do if a snake becomes defensive at you - For safety reasons, I always recommend removing yourself from the snake's vicinity as a first priority. If you find yourself very close to the snake and it is not acting defensively, for example a snake slithers past your foot, then it is generally better to remain perfectly still so that you don’t provoke any defensive behavior by moving. At the end of the day it is your call as to which course of action is more suited to your situation. If after watching this video you still believe snakes intentionally mean you harm, then please consider the following facts. 1) Venomous snakes don’t see us as prey and their only reason for biting is defense. 2) Snakes perceive humans and anything else larger than them (even vehicles) as large potential predators. Basically, if it’s big and it moves around them, they perceive it as a threat to their life and will defend themselves. 3) Snakes are NOT territorial and will only defend their personal safety, not a territory like a dog. 4) Snakes are born with every instinct they need to survive in the wild. One of these instincts is defensive behavior. They do not think - which human am I going to chase today. In their mind, they are simply trying to survive an encounter with a large predator. 5) Snakes respond to movement defensively (especially eastern browns). The more you move around, the more defensive they can become. 6) Statistics collected by scientists and hospital case studies, have proven that eastern brown snakes only envenomate 20-40% of the time. If you were a prey item (a rodent for example) they would envenomate 100% of the time. With dry bites being so common, it stands to reason that they instinctually know not to waste their venom on something they cannot eat. A venomous bite is simply a byproduct of the snake using biting as a technique to defend itself - not because the snake is intentionally trying to use its venom on a human or pet. The above info is designed to help the general public understand the defensive nature of snakes so they don’t put them selves at further risk by trying to kill the snake - This increases your chance of being bitten by 80% and does almost nothing to solve the person’s perceived 'snake problem'.
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3 weeks ago

 

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I haven´t read the whole text but it also looks like you are on the way to the safe hole in the ground hence the snake tries to scare you out of its escape route

This happens to me two day ago come state at me than took off I just froze

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared ABC Australia's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

❤️

ABC Australia
It’s only taken one acre of land to make regional Victoria feel like home for John Niyera ❤
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3 weeks ago

 

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Starting up a community garden at Butambala village

What a great story. Community gardens are just so fantastic in so many ways.

Ali Mawanda Jr. Waiswa Robert Namuwolo Evelynevelyn Nyangabyaki Simon

Wow great

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Making Mad's video.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

❤️

Making Mad
Self-confessed 'crazy plant lady' Summer Rayne has transformed her Brooklyn apartment into an urban jungle with her ever-growing collection of 500+ plants 🌱
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4 weeks ago

 

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Incredibly unhealthy to live in an environment full of spores!

Fiona Baker

...it doesn't get much Greener than this...pure dedication, passion and inspiration...the Crazy Plant Lady turns me on...!!!

Louise Ward

I wonder is she's planned for all the rot in the walls, floors and ceiling....

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Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Australian Organic Gardening's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

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1 month ago

 

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Yeah boys I’ll make a man outta you the right way 😂🤣😉😋

Jake Wood

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Compost Revolution's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

This is awesome!😍

Compost Revolution
This is just so cool. Pretty much the ultimate veggie patch.
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1 month ago

 

Comment on Facebook

Interesting to see so much ash used.

So satisfying to watch.

Mullumbimby Community Garden shared Victorian Equine Training's post.
Mullumbimby Community Garden

Great advice about Snake Bite Management#SnakeBite That bite of summer has well and truly come early this year and with that heat, comes snakes. This article was written by Rob Timmings Rob runs a medical/nursing education business Teaching nurses, doctors and paramedics. It’s well worth the read #ECT4Health 3000 bites are reported annually. 300-500 hospitalisations 2-3 deaths annually. Average time to death is 12 hours. The urban myth that you are bitten in the yard and die before you can walk from your chook pen back to the house is a load of rubbish. While not new, the management of snake bite (like a flood/fire evacuation plan or CPR) should be refreshed each season. Let’s start with a Basic overview. There are five genus of snakes that will harm us (seriously) Browns, Blacks, Adders, Tigers and Taipans. All snake venom is made up of huge proteins (like egg white). When bitten, a snake injects some venom into the meat of your limb (NOT into your blood). This venom can not be absorbed into the blood stream from the bite site. It travels in a fluid transport system in your body called the lymphatic system (not the blood stream). Now this fluid (lymph) is moved differently to blood. Your heart pumps blood around, so even when you are lying dead still, your blood still circulates around the body. Lymph fluid is different. It moves around with physical muscle movement like bending your arm, bending knees, wriggling fingers and toes, walking/exercise etc. Now here is the thing. Lymph fluid becomes blood after these lymph vessels converge to form one of two large vessels (lymphatic trunks)which are connected to veins at the base of the neck. Back to the snake bite site. When bitten, the venom has been injected into this lymph fluid (which makes up the bulk of the water in your tissues). The only way that the venom can get into your blood stream is to be moved from the bite site in the lymphatic vessels. The only way to do this is to physically move the limbs that were bitten. Stay still!!! Venom can’t move if the victim doesn’t move. Stay still!! Remember people are not bitten into their blood stream. In the 1980s a technique called Pressure immobilisation bandaging was developed to further retard venom movement. It completely stops venom /lymph transport toward the blood stream. A firm roll bandage is applied directly over the bite site (don’t wash the area). Technique: Three steps: keep them still Step 1 Apply a bandage over the bite site, to an area about 10cm above and below the bite. Step 2: Then using another elastic roller bandage, apply a firm wrap from Fingers/toes all the way to the armpit/groin. The bandage needs to be firm, but not so tight that it causes fingers or toes to turn purple or white. About the tension of a sprain bandage. Step 3: Splint the limb so the patient can’t walk or bend the limb. Do nots: Do not cut, incise or suck the venom. Do not EVER use a tourniquet Don’t remove the shirt or pants - just bandage over the top of clothing. Remember movement (like wriggling out of a shirt or pants) causes venom movement. DO NOT try to catch, kill or identify the snake!!! This is important. In hospital we NO LONGER NEED to know the type of snake; it doesn’t change treatment. 5 years ago we would do a test on the bite, blood or urine to identify the snake so the correct anti venom can be used. BUT NOW... we don’t do this. Our new Antivenom neutralises the venoms of all the 5 listed snake genus, so it doesn’t matter what snake bit the patient. Read that again- one injection for all snakes! Polyvalent is our one shot wonder, stocked in all hospitals, so most hospitals no longer stock specific Antivenins. Australian snakes tend to have 3 main effects in differing degrees. Bleeding - internally and bruising. Muscles paralysed causing difficulty talking, moving & breathing. Pain In some snakes severe muscle pain in the limb, and days later the bite site can break down forming a nasty wound. Allergy to snakes is rarer than winning lotto twice. Final tips: not all bitten people are envenomated and only those starting to show symptoms above are given antivenom. Did I mention to stay still. ~Rob Timmings Kingston/Robe Health Advisory ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Great advice about Snake Bite Management

 

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Excellent awareness which reassures the anxious parties who hate snakes. Thanks.

Anthony Tony Speed

Thanks Rob for the Snake bite advice

Good to know

Unfortunately, the information about the "one shot" anti-venom is incorrect. Bad reactions (such as anaphylaxis) are more likely with this approach - so best practice is to stick with specific anti-venoms unless absolutely necessary. However, the First Aid for a bite information is very good.

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