Jul 062014
 

New Brighton marketWhen: Every Tuesday from 8am-11am, rain or shine
Where: New Brighton Oval, River Street, 2483

Phone: 02 6677 1345
Email: newbrightonfarmersmarket@gmail.com
Website: http://newbrightonfarmersmarket.org.au

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11 months ago

Did you know more than half of all cut flowers sold in Australia are imported?

For roses, the figure could be closer to 90 percent, according to a recent ABC report.

‘I find it really sad’ says local grower and market stallholder Briana Atkin (pictured above), of Duranbah-based vegetable and flower farm, Jumping Red Ant.

‘The quality of our local flowers is so much better’.

The good news is, in the same way that we are becoming more conscious about our food and where it comes from, there’s a shift happening in the flower industry towards local and sustainable.

With all that has been going on this year, demand for local cut flowers at the farmers markets has been particularly strong, says Briana. People are keen to support local business, as well as bring some beauty into their lives during a tough time: ‘Flowers make people happy,’ she said.

Customers also appreciate the longevity of local flowers. ‘People are like - ‘I’ve still got your roses - they’ve been there for three weeks.’’

The next few months as we head into spring is boom time for local blooms, and Briana is especially excited about a new selection of striking proteas - South African and Australian natives - that will be on the stall this year.

‘We planted them in 2017 - they take two to three years to start flowering and now the first generation of them are just starting to come out in full force,’ she says.

Also coming up on the stall is a flush of spring roses: ‘They’ve just been cut back so they’re fresh from new bushes. They’re at best at this time of year - the head size is huge and the cooler weather means the colour is popping.’

Other varieties on the stall in spring will be ranunculus, which come in a stunning palette of bold and vivid colours, anemones and pretty, delicate straw flowers.

‘The stall is going to look amazing,’ Briana says.

#localflowers #springroses #proteas #ranunculus #anemones #strawflowers
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Did you know more than half of all cut flowers sold in Australia are imported? For roses, the figure could be closer to 90 percent, according to a recent ABC report. ‘I find it really sad’ says local grower and market stallholder Briana Atkin (pictured above), of Duranbah-based vegetable and flower farm, Jumping Red Ant. ‘The quality of our local flowers is so much better’. The good news is, in the same way that we are becoming more conscious about our food and where it comes from, there’s a shift happening in the flower industry towards local and sustainable. With all that has been going on this year, demand for local cut flowers at the farmers markets has been particularly strong, says Briana. People are keen to support local business, as well as bring some beauty into their lives during a tough time: ‘Flowers make people happy,’ she said. Customers also appreciate the longevity of local flowers. ‘People are like - ‘I’ve still got your roses - they’ve been there for three weeks.’’ The next few months as we head into spring is boom time for local blooms, and Briana is especially excited about a new selection of striking proteas - South African and Australian natives - that will be on the stall this year. ‘We planted them in 2017 - they take two to three years to start flowering and now the first generation of them are just starting to come out in full force,’ she says. Also coming up on the stall is a flush of spring roses: ‘They’ve just been cut back so they’re fresh from new bushes. They’re at best at this time of year - the head size is huge and the cooler weather means the colour is popping.’ Other varieties on the stall in spring will be ranunculus, which come in a stunning palette of bold and vivid colours, anemones and pretty, delicate straw flowers. ‘The stall is going to look amazing,’ Briana says. #localflowers #springroses #proteas #ranunculus #anemones #strawflowers
11 months ago

Have you visited Rebecca at the Playing with Fire native food stall? Rebecca joined us late last year and we’re thrilled to have her products at the market.

Rebecca became interested in Australian native foods about 20 years ago, after she stumbled across some native raspberries in the bush, and wondered why she’d never heard of them before.

‘I didn't even know we had native raspberries. I had no idea at all,’ she said.

‘I thought: ‘Why can't I buy these in the shops?’

Rebecca says Australia is home to more than 6000 native food plants, - and although there has been a growing awareness in recent years - most Australians would still struggle to name more than a handful.

‘Locally there’s a fair amount of knowledge, but when I go into a city, it’s still like ‘what is that?’ she said.

It’s a shame really, because aside from the tastes we’re missing out on, native foods have some hugely impressive nutritional and functional benefits, many of which are only just being recognised, Rebecca says.

Rebecca’s stall is the perfect place to explore some of the incredible flavours, aromas, colours and textures of Australian native foods. There are seasonal local rainforest fruits like Finger Lime, Davidsons Plum and Bunya Nuts, along with as teas, jams, sauces, honeys, dried fruit powders (great in smoothies), cordials, spices, teas and native food plants for your backyard.

You’ll find Rebecca at the market every Tuesday, near Summit Organics and Woodland Valley Farm.

#australiannativefood #fingerlime #wattleseed #davidsonplum #kakaduplum #lemonmyrtle #anisemyrtle #strawberrygum #localfood
... See MoreSee Less

Have you visited Rebecca at the Playing with Fire native food stall? Rebecca joined us late last year and we’re thrilled to have her products at the market. Rebecca became interested in Australian native foods about 20 years ago, after she stumbled across some native raspberries in the bush, and wondered why she’d never heard of them before. ‘I didnt even know we had native raspberries. I had no idea at all,’ she said. ‘I thought: ‘Why cant I buy these in the shops?’ Rebecca says Australia is home to more than 6000 native food plants, - and although there has been a growing awareness in recent years - most Australians would still struggle to name more than a handful. ‘Locally there’s a fair amount of knowledge, but when I go into a city, it’s still like ‘what is that?’ she said. It’s a shame really, because aside from the tastes we’re missing out on, native foods have some hugely impressive nutritional and functional benefits, many of which are only just being recognised, Rebecca says. Rebecca’s stall is the perfect place to explore some of the incredible flavours, aromas, colours and textures of Australian native foods. There are seasonal local rainforest fruits like Finger Lime, Davidsons Plum and Bunya Nuts, along with as teas, jams, sauces, honeys, dried fruit powders (great in smoothies), cordials, spices, teas and native food plants for your backyard. You’ll find Rebecca at the market every Tuesday, near Summit Organics and Woodland Valley Farm. #australiannativefood #fingerlime #wattleseed #davidsonplum #kakaduplum #lemonmyrtle #anisemyrtle #strawberrygum #localfood
11 months ago

Always another job to be done on the farm 👩‍🌾 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Gawd, nice flexibility but gosh that must take its toll on your back.

11 months ago

This is Sarah, the woman behind the wonderful product that is Byron Bay Tempeh
.
Sarah and partner Luc started making their tempeh in 2011, when they realised there was a lack of vegetarian protein options available at the markets. It was popular from Day 1 and they’ve been with us ever since.

Unlike traditional Indonesian tempeh, which is made with soybeans, Sarah and Luc make theirs with other legumes. There are three varieties - Chickpea; Split Pea and Brown Rice, and Fava Bean and Wakame (a type of seaweed)

‘We’re not anti-soy, we just wanted something different,' says Sarah.

'Vegetarian protein sources are traditionally soy-based - and it can be hard to find non-soy.'

To make the tempeh, the chickpeas, split peas and fava beans are inoculated with a culture (that Sarah grows and harvests herself) and then fermented - a process that gives tempeh its distinct flavour, and its health benefits.

'Being fermented, it's a really good probiotic,' Sarah says.

‘The fermenting process makes it pre-digested so you can absorb the nutrients really easily.’

All ingredients, except the fava beans, are organic and locally Australian grown.

SARAH’S TOP TEMPEH TIPS: For those new to tempeh, Sarah suggests trying it in a Tempeh Spaghetti Bolognaise (recipe in our stories today) ☝️which we can happily report was eaten by our picky child/teenage recipe testers 🙂.

You can also use it in burgers, or fry then break up and sprinkle on salads (it’s like little crunchy croutons) for a protein hit.
.
To prepare, slice the tempeh, heat a generous amount of oil, then fry for about one minute each side. Sprinkle with some salt to balance the fermented flavour.
.
#localfood #nonsoytempeh #tempeh #vegan #vegetarianprotein #vegetarian #fermentedfood #meatfreemondays
... See MoreSee Less

This is Sarah, the woman behind the wonderful product that is Byron Bay Tempeh . Sarah and partner Luc started making their tempeh in 2011, when they realised there was a lack of vegetarian protein options available at the markets. It was popular from Day 1 and they’ve been with us ever since. Unlike traditional Indonesian tempeh, which is made with soybeans, Sarah and Luc make theirs with other legumes. There are three varieties - Chickpea; Split Pea and Brown Rice, and Fava Bean and Wakame (a type of seaweed) ‘We’re not anti-soy, we just wanted something different, says Sarah. Vegetarian protein sources are traditionally soy-based - and it can be hard to find non-soy. To make the tempeh, the chickpeas, split peas and fava beans are inoculated with a culture (that Sarah grows and harvests herself) and then fermented - a process that gives tempeh its distinct flavour, and its health benefits. Being fermented, its a really good probiotic, Sarah says. ‘The fermenting process makes it pre-digested so you can absorb the nutrients really easily.’ All ingredients, except the fava beans, are organic and locally Australian grown. SARAH’S TOP TEMPEH TIPS: For those new to tempeh, Sarah suggests trying it in a Tempeh Spaghetti Bolognaise (recipe in our stories today) ☝️which we can happily report was eaten by our picky child/teenage recipe testers 🙂. You can also use it in burgers, or fry then break up and sprinkle on salads (it’s like little crunchy croutons) for a protein hit. . To prepare, slice the tempeh, heat a generous amount of oil, then fry for about one minute each side. Sprinkle with some salt to balance the fermented flavour. . #localfood #nonsoytempeh #tempeh #vegan #vegetarianprotein #vegetarian #fermentedfood #meatfreemondays
11 months ago

Simple delicious soup using market produce - by the amazing Janella Purcell ... See MoreSee Less

Simple delicious soup using market produce - by the amazing Janella Purcell
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